Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Renegades

My old hometown of Tucson, Arizona sits in the Sonoran Desert.  Thanks to time spent there, I knew right out of the box that these figures were inspired by Apache warriors.  Apaches wore a shirt, breechclout, and moccasins up to the knees.  They fought guerrilla wars against the Spanish, Mexicans, and Americans. Pursuers rarely found an Apache camp until they turned Apache against Apache, utilizing them as scouts. 

General George Cook described his Apache foes as "the tigers of the human species." Lieutenant Marion Maus described them by saying:  "For more than a year they made a running fight through the most rugged and barren portions of the Sierras, without subsistence of any kind except what they could rapidly snatch from the valleys as they swept from mountain to mountain, alternately scorched by the midsummer sun and chilled by the frost of snow clad peaks. At last, broken in spirit and worn in body, they buried the hatchet at the feet of their gallant pursuers. If the strategical skill and physical force manifested against the government by these outlaws can be directed to its advantage, no portion of our military establishment could be more efficient."
While a good parent cannot name favorites, a good painter can.  These renegades are my favorite of the 4 new factions for Dead Man's Hand.  Using historical photos, I sourced the simple face painting and also confirmed loinclouts were generally off white. I painted a couple red anyway just for variety. From start to finish, these were a joy to paint.
From Major John Cremony's book, Life Among the Apaches, here's a fabulous account of their ability to hide. 

"While crossing an extensive prairie, dotted here and there by a few shrubs and diminutive bushes, Quick Killer volunteered to show me with what dexterity an Apache could conceal himself, even where no special opportunity existed for such concealment. The offer was readily accepted, and we proceeded a short distance until we came to a small bush, hardly sufficient to hide a hare. Taking his stand behind this bush, he said: "Turn your back and wait until I give the signal." This proposition did not exactly suit my ideas of Apache character, and I said: "No, I will walk forward until you tell me to stop."

This was agreed upon, and quietly drawing my pistol, keeping a furtive glance over my shoulder, I advanced; but had not gone ten steps, when Quick Killer hailed me to stop and find him. I returned to the bush, went around it three or four times, looked in every direction--there was no possible covert in sight; the prairie was smooth and unbroken, and it seemed as if the earth had opened and swallowed up the man. Being unable to discover him, I called and bade him come forth, when, to my extreme surprise, he arose laughing and rejoiced, within two feet of the position I then occupied. With incredible activity and skill he had completely buried himself under the thick grama grass, within six feet of the bush, and had covered himself with such dexterity that one might have trodden upon him without discovering his person. I took no pains to conceal my astonishment and admiration, which delighted him exceedingly, and he informed me that their children were practiced regularly in this game of "hide and seek," until they became perfect adepts."
Geronimo and 2 of his sons
Apache scouts used to track renegade Apache clans. 

37 comments:

  1. Looking good. Those are some good looking Apaches.

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  2. Outstanding brushwork! Impressive Apaches.

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  3. I can wholeheartedly agree with these being your favorites, Monty. They are full of character, and your brushwork brought out the best of the excellent sculpts. Their history is often overlooked, if not forgotten entirely. I was just listening to a newscast about current events in the world, and the commentator mentioned that practically all modern nations have become so through "Right of Conquest." No wonder there is so much unrest. Warm regards, Dean

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    1. Thanks so much, Dean! History is indeed a wheel and the right of conquest has not yet died or been tamed.

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  4. Some frightening-looking warriors there, Monty, and well up to your usual standard. Well done!

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    1. Thanks Iowa! I hope you've had a great summer.

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  6. Very nice Apache warband. I can recommend 'Once they moved like the Wind' by David Roberts, a history from Cochise to Geronimo. Until I read this I had no idea of the viciousness of the fighting between the Mexicans and Apache.

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    1. Thanks Mark, I just grabbed that book at Amazon. It looks like a great one.

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  7. Truly stunning work Monty, I like everything about these from the sculpts themselves to the colours used - a triumph - Sir!

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    1. Thanks Michael, great scuplts are so much easier to paint!

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  8. The poses are so dynamic and you've painted them beautifully. I can see why they are your favourites.

    Thanks for including the history as much of it seems to be forgotten by white men. My future son-in-law is Native American. Half Shawnee and half Sioux. His father is an artist and did a lot of work for The Franklin Mint and also did the artwork for the Native American postal stamp series. I never thought my hot tempered daughter would find a man who could handle her. But this boy talks softly to her. He can calm her in an instant when she is in a temper. We call him The Jazz Whisperer. (Her real name is Jazz)

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    1. Anne, thanks so much!

      Jazz is such a lovely name, and I'm glad your daughter has met someone who brings her peace of mind and happiness. Congrats on your growing family!

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  9. Very cool and fierce looking Apaches Monty – I can certainly see why they are your favourites!

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    1. Thanks Jonas! They'll be quite fun to run in DMH, with hand to hand combat being their specialty.

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  10. Gorgeous work on these Apaches! They really look like I've always imagined them . You definitely managed to pack lots of character into their faces. Thanks also for the little historical insight.

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    1. Thanks Moiterei, I appreciate the comment on the faces! My pics were not the best but I did the skintones in 3 highlights. It took a bit of fiddling but I was pleased with the end results.

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  11. Love them, Monty. Sculpts have loads of character, and you've brought it out well.

    FMB

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    1. Thanks Marcus! I hope your move is going well!

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  12. Superbly painted Monty and the background was a great read.

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    1. Thanks Michael, it looks like I need to do a deeper dive with more reading!

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  13. Great post Monty, love the history and stories behind these guys. The figures look great too, really nice work. Cheers, Paul :-)

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    1. Thanks Paul! I wish I lived close enough to throw in on FoW with a tournament champion such as yourself. I could learn a thing or two!

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    1. Thanks Ray, and I did love your Italians. Your project just grows and grows!

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  15. Now they are lovely and a little history as well Monty.

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    1. Thanks Fran! To think that the city of Tucson was attacked by 600 Apaches at once. Hard to wrap your mind around it!

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  17. Excellent, characterful paintjob. They do justice to the photo I think.

    Cheers
    Stefan

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    1. Thanks Stefan! Sorry to be so slow, I was out on vacation for a couple of weeks.

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  18. Excellent work on these Apaches Monty, loce the last two pics too!

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    1. Thanks Phil! The B & W pictures are quite amazing.

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